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Time-constrained automata

  • Michael Merritt
  • Francesmary Modugno
  • Mark R. Tuttle
Selected Presentations
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 527)

Abstract

In this paper, we augment the input-output automaton model in order to reason about time in concurrent systems, and we prove simple properties of this augmentation. The input-output automata model is a useful model for reasoning about computation in concurrent and distributed systems because it allows fundamental properties such as fairness and compositionality to be expressed easily and naturally. A unique property of the model is that systems are modeled as the composition of autonomous components. This paper describes a way to add a notion of time to the model in a way that preserves these properties. The result is a simple, compositional model for real-time computation that provides a convenient notation for expressing timing properties such as bounded fairness.

Keywords

Timing Property Compositional Model Concurrent System Time Automaton Autonomous Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Merritt
    • 1
  • Francesmary Modugno
    • 2
  • Mark R. Tuttle
    • 3
  1. 1.AT&T Bell LaboratoriesMurray Hill
  2. 2.School of Computer ScienceCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburgh
  3. 3.DEC Cambridge Research LabCambridge

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