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Student modelling in a keyboard scale tutoring system

  • N. H. Amato
  • C. P. Tsang
Tutoring
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 406)

Abstract

The student modelling module of an intelligent tutoring system represents the student's internal cognitive structures of the relevant domain. The model is important because it assists the system in providing individualised instruction based on student requirements. The use of a combination of student modelling techniques, along with the rules governing the application of the different techniques is discussed. This provides a flexible and powerful student model for a keyboard scale tutoring system.

Keywords and Phrases

hypothesis student modelling piano scales knowledge concepts confidence factors 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. H. Amato
    • 1
  • C. P. Tsang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceThe University of Western AustraliaNedlandsAustralia

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