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Analogical inference as generalised inductive inference

  • Christopher J. Thornton
Submitted Papers Analogical Reasoning
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 397)

Abstract

Analogical inference and inductive inference are processes which achieve roughly the same end (the development of new knowledge) via rather different means. But what is the relationship between these two processes? The current paper suggests that, in the context of the structure-mapping model of analogy

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Thornton
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Artificial IntelligenceUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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