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Systematic development of formal software process models

  • Wolfgang Deiters
  • Volker Gruhn
  • Wilhelm Schäfer
Software Processes Modelling
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 387)

Abstract

This paper proposes a structured approach to the incremental development of generic Models for Software Processes. Structured means that the developer is guided by an underlying systematic method when specifying the complex set of items constituting a complete description of a Software Process. Incremental means that it is possible to test, execute, and analyse incomplete specifications. Generic means that suitable mechanisms are provided to adapt a particular model to the specific requirements of a single company or user. The approach is based on a formal language which merges three existing approaches, namely a Data Definition Language, Function Nets as an extension of high-level Petri Nets, and graph replacement systems, into one homogeneous Software Process modeling language. It is explained how this language provides suitable means to specify the static features of a process model, the dynamics of processes, and the modifications of the processes. Finally, it is sketched how a process model is defined, i.e. this language can be executed for simulation reasons as well as for the control of a Software Process supported by the tools within the Software Development Environment.

Keywords

Software Development Environment Software Factory Software Process Model for Software Processes method high-level Petri Nets Function Nets graph replacement systems 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Deiters
    • 1
  • Volker Gruhn
    • 2
  • Wilhelm Schäfer
    • 1
  1. 1.Software Technology CenterDortmund 50Federal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Computer Science Software TechnologyUniversity of DortmundDortmund 50Federal Republic of Germany

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