Skip to main content

Genetic Programming as a Darwinian Invention Machine

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS,volume 1598)

Abstract

Genetic programming is known to be capable of creating designs that satisfy prespecified high-level design requirements for analog electrical circuits and other complex structures. However, in the real world, it is often important that a design satisfy various non-technical requirements. One such requirement is that a design not possess the key characteristics of any previously known design. This paper shows that genetic programming can be used to generate novel solutions to a design problem so that genetic programming may be potentially used as an invention machine. This paper turns the clock back to the period just before the time (1917) when George Campbell of American Telephone and Telegraph invented and patented the design for an electrical circuit that is now known as the ladder filter. Genetic programming is used to reinvent the Campbell filter. The paper then turns the clock back to the period just before the time (1928) when Wilhelm Cauer invented and patented the elliptic filter. Genetic programming is then used to reinvent a technically equivalent filter that avoids the key characteristics of then-preexisting Campbell filter. Genetic programming can be used as an invention machine by employing a two-part fitness measure that incorporates both the degree to which an individual in the population satisfies the given technical requirements and the degree to which the individual does not possess the key characteristics of preexisting technology.

Keywords

  • Genetic Programming
  • Fitness Measure
  • Test Fixture
  • Fitness Case
  • Shunt Capacitor

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/3-540-48885-5_8
  • Chapter length: 16 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   74.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-540-48885-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   99.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Aaserud, O. and Nielsen, I. Ring. 1995. Trends in current analog design: A panel debate. Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing. 7(1) 5–9.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Andre, David and Koza, John R. 1996. Parallel genetic programming: A scalable implementation using the transputer architecture. In Angeline, P. J. and Kinnear, K. E. Jr. (editors). 1996. Advances in Genetic Programming 2. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Angeline, Peter J. and Kinnear, Kenneth E. Jr. (editors). 1996. Advances in Genetic Programming 2. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Banzhaf, Wolfgang, Nordin, Peter, Keller, Robert E., and Francone, Frank D. 1998. Genetic Programming-An Introduction. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann and Heidelberg: dpunkt.

    CrossRef  MATH  Google Scholar 

  • Banzhaf, Wolfgang, Poli, Riccardo, Schoenauer, Marc, and Fogarty, Terence C. 1998. Genetic Programming: First European Workshop. EuroGP’98. Paris, France, April 1998 Proceedings. Paris, France. April l998. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Volume 1391. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Campbell, George A. 1917. Electric Wave Filter. Filed July 15, 1915. U. S. Patent 1,227,113. Issued May 22, 1917.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cauer, Wilhelm. 1934. Artificial Network. U. S. Patent 1,958,742. Filed June 8, 1928 in Germany. Filed December 1, 1930 in United States. Issued May 15, 1934.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cauer, Wilhelm. 1935. Electric Wave Filter. U. S. Patent 1,989,545. Filed June 8, 1928. Filed December 6, 1930 in United States. Issued January 29, 1935.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cauer, Wilhelm. 1936. Unsymmetrical Electric Wave Filter. Filed November 10, 1932 in Germany. Filed November 23, 1933 in United States. Issued July 21, 1936.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gruau, Frederic. 1992. Cellular Encoding of Genetic Neural Networks. Technical report 92-21. Laboratoire de l’Informatique du Parallélisme. Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon. May 1992.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gruau, Frederic. 1994a. Neural Network Synthesis using Cellular Encoding and the Genetic Algorithm. PhD Thesis. Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gruau, Frederic. 1994b. Genetic micro programming of neural networks. In Kinnear, Kenneth E. Jr. (editor). 1994. Advances in Genetic Programming. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Pages 495–518.

    Google Scholar 

  • Holland, John H. 1975. Adaptation in Natural and Artificial Systems. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kinnear, Kenneth E. Jr. (editor). 1994. Advances in Genetic Programming. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kitano, Hiroaki. 1990. Designing neural networks using genetic algorithms with graph generation system. Complex Systems. 4(1990) 461–476.

    MATH  Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R. 1992. Genetic Programming: On the Programming of Computers by Means of Natural Selection. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    MATH  Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R. 1994a. Genetic Programming II: Automatic Discovery of Reusable Programs. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R. 1994b. Genetic Programming II Videotape: The Next Generation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R. 1995. Evolving the architecture of a multi-part program in genetic programming using architecture-altering operations. In McDonnell, John R., Reynolds, Robert G., and Fogel, David B. (editors). Evolutionary Programming IV: Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Conference on Evolutionary Programming. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Pages 695–717.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R., Banzhaf, Wolfgang, Chellapilla, Kumar, Deb, Kalyanmoy, Dorigo, Marco, Fogel, David B., Garzon, Max H., Goldberg, David E., Iba, Hitoshi, and Riolo, Rick. (editors). 1998. Genetic Programming 1998: Proceedings of the Third Annual Conference. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R., Bennett III, Forrest H, Andre, David, and Keane, Martin A. 1999. Genetic Programming III: Darwinian Invention and Problem Solving. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R., Bennett III, Forrest H, Andre, David, Keane, Martin A, and Dunlap, Frank. 1997. Automated synthesis of analog electrical circuits by means of genetic programming. IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation. 1(2). Pages 109–128.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R., Deb, Kalyanmoy, Dorigo, Marco, Fogel, David B., Garzon, Max, Iba, Hitoshi, and Riolo, Rick L. (editors). 1997. Genetic Programming 1997: Proceedings of the Second Annual Conference San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R., Goldberg, David E., Fogel, David B., and Riolo, Rick L. (editors). 1996. Genetic Programming 1996: Proceedings of the First Annual Conference. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koza, John R., and Rice, James P. 1992. Genetic Programming: The Movie. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Langdon, William B. 1998. Genetic Programming and Data Structures: Genetic Programming + Data Structures = Automatic Programming! Amsterdam: Kluwer.

    CrossRef  MATH  Google Scholar 

  • Lingas, Andrzej. 1981. Certain algorithms for subgraph isomorphism problems. In Astesiano, E. and Bohm, C. (editors). Proceedings of the. Sixth Colloquium on Trees in Algebra and Programming. Lecture Notes on Computer Science. Springer Verlag. Volume 112. Pages 290–307.

    Google Scholar 

  • Quarles, Thomas, Newton, A. R., Pederson, D. O., and Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, A.1994. SPICE 3 Version 3F5 User’s Manual. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California. Berkeley, CA. March 1994.

    Google Scholar 

  • Samuel, Arthur L. 1983. AI: Where it has been and where it is going. Proceedings of the Eighth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. Los Altos, CA: Morgan Kaufmann. Pages 1152–1157.

    Google Scholar 

  • Spector, Lee, Langdon, William B., O’Reilly, Una-May, and Angeline, Peter (editors). 1999. Advances in Genetic Programming 3. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sterling, Thomas L., Salmon, John, and Becker, Donald J., and Savarese. 1999. How to Build a Beowulf: A Guide to Implementation and Application of PC Clusters. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ullman, J. R. 1976. An algorithm for subgraph isomorphism. Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery. 23(1) 31–42. January 1976.

    MathSciNet  CrossRef  MATH  Google Scholar 

  • Williams, Arthur B. and Taylor, Fred J. 1995. Electronic Filter Design Handbook. Third Edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 1999 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

About this paper

Cite this paper

Koza, J.R., Bennett, F.H., Stiffelman, O. (1999). Genetic Programming as a Darwinian Invention Machine. In: Poli, R., Nordin, P., Langdon, W.B., Fogarty, T.C. (eds) Genetic Programming. EuroGP 1999. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 1598. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-48885-5_8

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-48885-5_8

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-65899-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-48885-9

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive