Advertisement

A Java-Based Model of Resource Sharing among Independent Users on the Internet

  • James TenEyck
  • G. Sampath
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2110)

Abstract

A recently proposed model of resource sharing among autonomous computers on the internet extends the sharing beyond data to hard resources such as processor (both main and coprocessors) and archival storage. Storage sharing increases storage reliability by replicating the data on the disks of cooperating users across the internet. Processor sharing gives a user access to another user’s main processor (as well as graphics hardware, non-standard processors, etc.) based on the latter’s altruism or some kind of barter arrangement. A Java environment in which such sharing can be implemented is described. Implementation of storage sharing is relatively simple, but processor sharing is more complicated. A method for forming resource-sharing communities is presented. In this method, a bulletin board hierarchy is used to direct participants to an appropriate community of common interest, and a Java-based mechanism for sharing resources within such a community is presented. The suitability of Jini to an implementation is also discussed.

Keywords

Bulletin Board Processor Sharing State Transition Diagram Resource Broker Host Machine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    T. Berners-Lee.. World-wide Computer. Communs. ACM 40(2) (1997) 76–82.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. Brave, H. Ishii, and A. Dahley. Tangible interfaces for remote collaboration and communication. In: Proceedings of the 1998_ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (1998) 169–178.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    W.K. Edwards. Core Jini. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River (1999).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Scott M. Lewandowski. Frameworks for component-based client-server computing. ACM Computing Surveys 30(1), 3–27 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    T.L. Lewis. The next 100002 years. Parts I and II. IEEE Computer, April 1996, 64-70, May 1996, 78–86.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Mahmoud, Qusay H. The Web as a global computing platform. In Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on High Performance Computing and Networking Europe (HPCN99): Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1593, 281–300. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1999.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    C.J. Patten, K.A. Hawick, and J.F. Hercus. Towards a scalable metacomputing storage service. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on High Performance Computing and Networking Europe (HPCN99): Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1593, 350–359. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1999.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    G. Sampath and J. TenEyck. Resource sharing among autonomous computers on the Internet. To appear in the Proceedings of the Global Technology Conference, Dallas (Texas), June 10-12, 2001.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    P. Sridharan. Java Network Programming. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River (1997).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • James TenEyck
    • 1
  • G. Sampath
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceMarist CollegePoughkeepsie
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceThe College of New JerseyEwing

Personalised recommendations