Advertisement

Emancipatory Learning via the Internet: A Model for Reducing Maori Socio-economic Exclusion in Aotearoa/New Zealand

  • Andy Williamson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2105)

Abstract

Recent debate has suggested that the under-achievement of Maori (and indeed other indigenous or minority groups) is the result of social exclusion based on their socio-economic circumstances. This argument is supported by the over-representation of Maori in most negative socio-economic statistics in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Emancipatory learning is an educational philosophy directed at ending exclusion through learning models created by the community for the community, where learning is developed in a way that enables the learner to understand their own position and, therefore, create the potential for change. The Internet offers a tool that is not only relatively ubiquitous but also economical in terms of media development. The Internet, therefore, presents a potentially suitable platform to develop emancipatory learning solutions and communities of like that can be localised and offer the potential for interaction with similar groups elsewhere.

Keywords

Indigenous Knowledge Adult Education Virtual Community Social Entrepreneur Critical Pedagogy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    McMurchy-Pilkington, C., Ina te mahi he Rangatira, in He paepae körero: Research perspectives in Mäori education, B. Webber, Editor. 1996, New Zealand Council for Educational Research: Welllington.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Durie, M., Te mana, te käwanatanga: The politics of Mäori self-determination. 1998, Auckland: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Chapple, S., Maori socio-economic disparity,. 2000, Labour Market Policy Group, Department of Labour: Wellington.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Freire, P., Pedagogy of the oppressed. 1972, Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Freire, P. and I. Shor, A pedagogy for liberation: Dialogues on transforming education. 1987, London: MacMillan.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Paulin, K., Putting Pakeha in the picture: Analysing lesbian/bi-sexual politics in Aotearoa/New Zealand, in Representing the other: A feminism and psychology reader, S Wilkinson and C. Kitzinger, Editors. 1996, Sage: London.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Roberts, G.M.O.B., Action researching my practice as a facilitator of experiential learning with pastoralist farmers in Central West Queensland, in The School of Agriculture and Rural Development. 1997, University of Western Sydney: Richmond, NSW.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    National Institute for Adult Continuing Education, Emancipatory learning. 2000: National Institute for Adult Continuing Education. See http://www.niace.org.uk/Information/Briefing_sheets/Emancipatorylearningmar00
  9. 9.
    Schugurensky, D., 1968: Paolo Freire publishes Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Undated: University of Toronto. See http://fcis.oise.utoronto.ca/~danial_schugurensky/assignment1/1968pedofopp
  10. 10.
    Giddings, L., In/visibility in nursing: Stories from the margins, in Faculty of the Graduate School. 1997, University of Colorado: Denver, CO.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Heaney, T., Adult education for social change: From center stage to the wings and back again. 1995: ERIC Digest. See http://www.nlu.//nl.edu/ace/Resources/Documents/ERIC1.html
  12. 12.
    Du Plessis, R. and L. Alice, Feminisms, connections and differences, in Feminist thought in Aotearoa New Zealand, R. Du Plessis and L. Alice, Editors. 1998, Oxford Unversity Press: Auckland.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sullivan, K., Bicultural education in Aotearoa/New Zealand, in New Zealand annual review of education/Te arotake a tau o te ao o te mataurangi i Aotearoa, H. Manson, Editor. 1994, Victoria University: Wellington, NZ.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
  15. 15.
    James, P., Case study: Sealord and treaty settlement, in Changing places: New Zealand in the nineties, R. Le Heron and E. Pawson, Editors. 1996, Longman Paul: Auckland.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Keefe, V., et al. Mauri mahi, mauri ora, mauri noho, mauri mate: Health effects of unemployment portfolio. in Te Oru Rangahau: Maori Research and Development Conference. 1998. Massey University, Palmerston North: Massey University.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Te Puni Kokiri, Maori unemployment,. 1999, Te Puni Kokiri/Ministry of Maori Affairs: Wellington, NZ.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Nga korero o te wa, Nga korero: Business, in Nga korero o te wa. 1999.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
    Cunningham, C. A framework for addressing Maori knowledge in research, science and technology. in Te Oru Rangahau: Maori Research and Development Conference. 1998. Massey University, Palmerston North: Massey University.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Gorjestani, N. Indigenous knowledge for development. in First international conference on rural telecommunications. 1998. Valletta, Malta: International Telecommunications Union.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Penetito, W. ‘He haeata tiaho’: Straetgic planning for whanau, hapu and iwi education. In Te Oru Rangahau: Maori Research and Development Conference. 1998. Massey University, Palmerston North: Massey University.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Jeffries, R. Maori participation in tertiary education-Barriers and strategies to overcome them. in Te Oru Rangahau: Maori Research and Development Conference. 1998. Massey University, Palmerston North: Massey University.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Henry, E. Kaupapa Maori: Locating indigenous ontology, epistemology and methodology in the academy. in Building the research capacity within Maori communities. 1999. Wellington: New Zealand Council for Educational Research.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Pere, R.R. Different ways of knowing. in Building the research capacity within Maori communities. 1999. Wellington: New Zealand Council for Educational Research.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Sullivan, R., Star waka. 1999, Auckland, N.Z.: Auckland University Press.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Hall, M., Realizing the virtual hamburger: Education and the margins of the network society. 2000: University of Cape Town. See http://www.//chet.org.za/debates/MartinHall.html
  28. 28.
    Bhalla, A.S. and F. Lapeyre, Poverty and exclusion in a global world. 1999, Basingstoke: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Croteau, D., Politics and the class divide: Working people and the middle class left. Labour and social change, ed. P. Rayman and C. Sirianni. 1999, Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Marx, K., Capital. 1981, London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Pitt, D., Are there social classes in New Zealand, in Social class in New Zealand, D. Pitt, Editor. 1977, Longman Paul: Auckland, N.Z.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Lawley, E.L., The sociology of culture in computer-mediated communication: An initial exploration. 1994: Elizabeth Lawley. See http://www.//itcs.com/elawley/bourdieu.html
  33. 33.
    Choi, S.-Y., D.O. Stahl, and A.B. Whinston, The economics of electronic commerce. 1997, Indianapolis, IN: Macmillan Technical Publishing.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Sterling, B., Short History of the Internet. 1993: University of Chicago. See http://www.w3.//aces.uiuc.edu/AIM/scale/nethistory.html
  35. 35.
    CERN, The World Wide Web. 1998: CERN. See public.web.cern.ch/Public/ACHIEVEMENTS/web.htmlGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Nua Ltd, How many online? 2000: Nua Ltd. See http://www.nua.ie/surveys/how_many_online/index.html
  37. 37.
    IDC, New Zealand Most Wired Country in Asia Pacific,. 2000, International Data Corporation: New York.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Arnum, E., Internet topology and connectivity in the Americas,. 1999, Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network.: Brasília, Brazil.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Castells, M., The social implications of information and communication technologies, in World social science report, UNESCO, Editor. 1999, UNESCO: New York.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Everton, G., Telephone conversation with the author,. 2000.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Information Technology Advisory Group, The Knowledge Economy,. 1999, Information Technology Advisory Group.: Wellington, N.Z.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Nee, E., Interview with Manual Castells, in Fortune. 2000. p. 114.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Tangaere, A.R., Maori human development learning theory, in He paepae körero: Research perspectives in Mäori education, B. Webber, Editor. 1996, New Zealand Council for Educational Research: Welllington.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Aspin, C., Learning mathematics in Maori, in He paepae körero: Research perspectives in Mäori education, B. Webber, Editor. 1996, New Zealand Council for Educational Research: Welllington.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Leu, D.J. and C.K. Kinzer, The convergence of literacy instruction with networked technologies for information and communication. Reading Research Quarterly, 2000. 35(1): p. 108–127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Rheingold, H., The virtual community. 1994, London: Minerva.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andy Williamson
    • 1
  1. 1.Wairua ConsultingWaitakere CityNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations