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All Languages in NP Have Divertible Zero-Knowledge Proofs and Arguments Under Cryptographic Assumptions

Extended Abstract
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 473)

Abstract

We present a divertible zero-knowledge proof (argument) for SAT under the assumption that probabilistic encryption homomorphisms exist. Our protocol uses a simple ‘swapping’ technique which can be applied to many zero knowledge proofs (arguments). In particular we obtain a divertible zero-knowledge proof for graph isomorphism. The consequences for abuse-free zero-knowledge proofs are also considered.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. of MathematicsRHBNC - University of LondonEgham, SurreyUK
  2. 2.Dept. EE & CSUniv. of Wisconsin — MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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