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A New Tool for Surgical Training in Knee Arthroscopy

  • Giuseppe Megali
  • Oliver Tonet
  • Marcello Mazzoni
  • Paolo Dario
  • Alberto Vascellari
  • Maurilio Marcacci
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2489)

Abstract

This paper presents an educational method for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and an integrated system to train a priori knowledge and to exercise manual dexterity. The approach is generally suitable for MIS interventions but has been developed specifically for knee arthroscopy. Based on a classification of the knowledge required for performing arthroscopy procedures, the system provides multimedia modules to train and assess anatomical and procedural knowledge and a virtual reality-based simulator for training perceptual-motor skills. The system is currently being experimented for metrics definition and extended incorporating networked database management.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giuseppe Megali
    • 1
  • Oliver Tonet
    • 1
  • Marcello Mazzoni
    • 1
  • Paolo Dario
    • 1
  • Alberto Vascellari
    • 2
  • Maurilio Marcacci
    • 2
  1. 1.CRIMPisaItaly
  2. 2.Biomechanics Lab, Istituti Ortopedici RizzoliBolognaItaly

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