Distributing Event Information by Simulating Word-of-Mouth Exchanges

  • Elaine M. Huang
  • Michael Terry
  • Elizabeth Mynatt
  • Kent Lyons
  • Alan Chen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2411)

Abstract

Word-of-mouth is a persuasive but error-prone and unreliable mode of communicating personally relevant event information in a university environment. In this paper we present a design, early prototype, and the results of preliminary usability tests for Augmented Word-of-mouth Exchange (AWE), a portable system that models and enhances word-of-mouth communications. AWE simulates word-of-mouth exchanges by automatically transmitting accurate and persistent information about community events between physically proximate devices, and by visualizing the popularity of each event. The system uses physical proximity between mobile devices to help users filter incoming information and determine its relevance.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elaine M. Huang
    • 1
  • Michael Terry
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Mynatt
    • 1
  • Kent Lyons
    • 1
  • Alan Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.College of ComputingGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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