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Review: Intelligent Agents for Computer Games

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS,volume 2063)

Abstract

In modern computer games-like action, adventure, role-playing, strategy, simulation and sports games-artificial intelligence (AI) techniques play an important role. However, the requirements of such games are very different from those of the games normally studied in AI.

This article discusses which approaches and fields of research are relevant to achieve a sophisticated goal-directed behavior for modern computer games’nonplayer characters. It also presents a classification of approaches for autonomous agents and gives an overview of a solution developed in the Excalibur project.

Keywords

  • commercial games
  • action planning
  • real time
  • dynamics
  • incomplete
  • knowledge
  • resources

Acknowledgments

The Excalibur project is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG), Conitec Datensysteme GmbH, Cross Platform Research Germany (CPR) and NICOSIO. Thanks to Reijer Grimbergen for his suggestions on how to improve this paper.

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© 2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Nareyek, A. (2001). Review: Intelligent Agents for Computer Games. In: Marsland, T., Frank, I. (eds) Computers and Games. CG 2000. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 2063. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45579-5_28

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45579-5_28

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