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Reconstructing 3D Boundary Element Heart Models from 2D Biplane Fluoroscopy

  • Henri Veisterä
  • Jyrki Lötjönen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2230)

Abstract

Individual 3D boundary element models can be used in solving inverse problems in electro- and magnetocardiographic measurements. In some cases 3D data, such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) or Computed Tomography (CT) images, are not available. Therefore, it would be useful to be able to use 2D images such as X-ray projections for creating 3D models. The aim of this work was to develop a software package for creating a 3D boundary element heart model from two orthogonal X-ray projections. The biplane fluoroscopy images from a patient are digitized and the images are enhanced with different image processing techniques. The patient heart outline is segmented from the X-ray projections. The outline is compared with virtual X-ray projections created from a prior 3D model segmented from MR images. The difference between the outlines is used to deform the prior model. The quality of the digitized X-ray projections was noticeably improved and thus the heart outline segmentation was facilitated. The deformation method implemented is robust and provides good results even when the source parameters contain errors.

Keywords

Source Image Prior Model Active Contour Model Heart Model Cine Magnetic Resonance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henri Veisterä
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jyrki Lötjönen
    • 3
  1. 1.Helsinki University of TechnologyHUTFinland
  2. 2.BioMag LaboratoryHelsinki University Central HospitalHUSFinland
  3. 3.VTT Information TechnologyTampereFinland

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