Unearthing Virtual History: Using Diverse Interfaces to Reveal Hidden Virtual Worlds

  • Steve Benford
  • John Bowers
  • Paul Chandler
  • Luigina Ciolfi
  • Martin Flintham
  • Mike Fraser
  • Chris Greenhalgh
  • Tony Hall
  • Sten Olof Hellström
  • Shahram Izadi
  • Tom Rodden
  • Holger Schnädelbach
  • Ian Taylor
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2201)

Abstract

We describe an application in which museum visitors hunt for virtual history outdoors, capture it, and bring it back indoors for detailed inspection. This application provides visitors with ubiquitous access to a parallel virtual world as they move through an extended physical space. Diverse devices, including mobile wireless interfaces for locating hotspots of virtual activity outdoors, provide radically different experiences of the virtual depending upon location, task, and available equipment. Initial reflections suggest that the physical design of such devices needs careful attention so as to encourage an appropriate style of use. We also consider the extension of our experience to support enacted scenes. Finally, we discuss potential benefits of using diverse devices to make a shared underlying virtual world ubiquitously available throughout physical space.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steve Benford
    • 1
  • John Bowers
    • 2
  • Paul Chandler
    • 1
  • Luigina Ciolfi
    • 3
  • Martin Flintham
    • 1
  • Mike Fraser
    • 1
  • Chris Greenhalgh
    • 1
  • Tony Hall
    • 3
  • Sten Olof Hellström
    • 2
  • Shahram Izadi
    • 1
  • Tom Rodden
    • 1
  • Holger Schnädelbach
    • 1
  • Ian Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.The Mixed Reality LaboratoryUniversity of NottinghamUK
  2. 2.Centre for User-Oriented IT-Design (CID)Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)StockholmSweden
  3. 3.Interaction Design CentreUniversity of LimerickIreland

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