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Rendering with Non-uniform Approximate Concentric Mosaics

  • Jinxiang Chai
  • Sing Bing Kang
  • Heung-Yeung Shum
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2018)

Abstract

In this paper, we explore the more practical aspects of building and rendering concentric mosaics. First, we use images captured with only approximately circular camera trajectories. The image sequence capture can be achieved by holding a camcorder in position and rotating the body all around. In addition, we investigate the use of variable input sampling and fidelity of scene geometry based on the level of interest (and hence quality of view synthesized) on the objects in the scene.We achieve the tolerance for minor perturbations about the exact circular camera path and variable input sampling by using and analyzing a variant of the Hough space of all captured rays. Examples using real scenes are shown to validate our approach.

Keywords

Input Image Bilinear Interpolation Angular Direction Depth Correction Scene Geometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jinxiang Chai
    • 1
  • Sing Bing Kang
    • 2
  • Heung-Yeung Shum
    • 3
  1. 1.The Robotics InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Vision Technology Group, Microsoft ResearchRedmondUSA
  3. 3.Microsoft ResearchBeijingChina

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