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Force-Based Interaction for Distributed Precision Assembly

  • Richard T. DeLuca
  • Alfred A. Rizzi
  • Ralph L. Hollis
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences book series (LNCIS, volume 271)

Abstract

This paper documents our efforts to instantiate force-guided cooperative behaviors between robotic agents in the minifactory environment. Minifactory incorporates high-precision 2-DOF robotic agents to perform micron-level precision 4-DOF assembly tasks. Here we utilize two mini-factory agents to perform compliant insertion. We present a custom force sensing device which has been developed as well as the control and communication systems used to coordinate the action of the agents. Finally, we conclude by presenting a set of experimental results which document the performance of the new force sensor as integrated in the minifactory system. These results document the first experimental confirmation of high-bandwidth (> 100Hz) coordination between agents within the minifactory system.

Keywords

Force Sensor Impedance Control Overhead Manipulator Lateral Contact Distribute Control System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard T. DeLuca
    • 1
  • Alfred A. Rizzi
    • 1
  • Ralph L. Hollis
    • 1
  1. 1.The Robotics InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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