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Macroadapting Animalwatch to Gender and Cognitive Differences with Respect to Hint Interactivity and Symbolism

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Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS 2000)

Part of the book series: Lecture Notes in Computer Science ((LNCS,volume 1839))

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Abstract

We have built empirical models of elementary-school students’ behavior from analyzing student interaction with a mathematics tutor with the objective of building teaching policies for individually different students. This model incorporates external information about the student, namely cognitive development and gender. It also incorporates hint features, namely the degree of interactivity and symbolism of each hint given. We found that boys benefit better from non-interactive and low-intrusive hints, while girls benefit better from highly interactive hints. We found that low symbolic hints are more effective for low cognitive ability students than highly symbolic ones, and the opposite happens for high cognitive ability students.

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© 2000 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Arroyo, I., Beck, J.E., Woolf, B.P., Beal, C.R., Schultz, K. (2000). Macroadapting Animalwatch to Gender and Cognitive Differences with Respect to Hint Interactivity and Symbolism. In: Gauthier, G., Frasson, C., VanLehn, K. (eds) Intelligent Tutoring Systems. ITS 2000. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 1839. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45108-0_61

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45108-0_61

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-67655-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-45108-2

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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