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Using XML and Other Techniques to Enhance Supportability of Diagnostic Expert Systems

  • Graham Forsyth
  • John Delaney
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1821)

Abstract

Over the last year, interest in a new language called eXtensible Markup Language (XML) has risen remarkably. XML, a key part of many electronic commerce strategies, may also help make diagnostic software more supportable and hence more useful. Until now, Diagnostic Expert Systems usually used “shells” comprising an inference engine, user interfaces and a means of storing the rules. Our new design incorporates the JavaScript inference engine and the user interface in code for a standard web browser and translates the rules into XML. Supportability is improved by clear separation into: (i) standard commercial software maintained by the computing contractor, (ii) active web-pages maintainable by the software contractor, and (iii) the commercial database of domain knowledge maintained by the local domain experts as electronic documentation. A field trial diagnosing TF30 engines in RAAF F-111s is developing procedures and specifications for its production.

Keywords

Inference Engine eXtensible Markup Concept Demonstrator Expert System Shell Active Server Pages 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham Forsyth
    • 1
  • John Delaney
    • 2
  1. 1.DSTO, Airframes and Engines DivisionMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.eVision Pty LtdMelbourneAustralia

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