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Adapting to the User’s Internet Search Strategy

  • Jean-David Ruvini
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2702)

Abstract

World Wide Web search engines typically return thousands of results to the users. To avoid users browsing through the whole list of results, search engines use ranking algorithms to order the list according to predefined criteria. In this paper, we present Toogle, a front-end to the Google search engine for both desktop browsers and mobile phones. For a given search query, Toogle first ranks results using Google’s algorithm and, as the user browses through the result list, uses machine learning techniques to infer a model of her search goal and to adapt accordingly the order in which the results are presented. We describe preliminary experimental results that show the effectiveness of Toogle.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-David Ruvini
    • 1
  1. 1.e-lab Bouygues SASt Quentin en YvelinesFrance

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