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Equipping a Lifelike Animated Agent with a Mind

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNAI,volume 2190)

Abstract

This paper presents a computational mind model for lifelike animated agents. It consists of a motivational system and an emotional system. The motivational system guides an agent’s behaviour by generating goals. The emotional system exerts further control over the agent’s behaviour by regulating and modulating the way that behaviour is undertaken. The mind model is embedded in a layered hierarchical agent architecture that provides a framework and flexible way of modelling these system’s influence on each other, and ultimately on the behaviour of lifelike agents. The mind model together with the agent architecture is implemented using a logical formalism, i.e. the Event Calculus. We have followed this approach to develop and control an animated lifelike agent operating in a virtual campus.

Keywords

  • Active Goal
  • Agent Architecture
  • Interface Agent
  • Primitive Action
  • Motivational Profile

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Chen, L., Bechkoum, K., Clapworthy, G. (2001). Equipping a Lifelike Animated Agent with a Mind. In: de Antonio, A., Aylett, R., Ballin, D. (eds) Intelligent Virtual Agents. IVA 2001. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 2190. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_7

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-42570-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-44812-9

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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