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Autonomous Avatars? From Users to Agents and Back

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNAI,volume 2190)

Abstract

We describe the architecture of an interactive, “believable” agent with personality, called user agent, which can act on behalf of a user in various multi-user game contexts, when she is not online. In a first step, information about the personality of the user is obtained from a questionnaire and then, in a second step, integrated in the reactive system of the user agent, part of which implements a primitive affective system. User agents can interact with their users through a simple affective natural language generation system (SARGS), which is integrated in the deliberative system of the user agent and can recount what happened to the user agent in the game while the user was not present.

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© 2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Scheutz, M., Römmer, B. (2001). Autonomous Avatars? From Users to Agents and Back. In: de Antonio, A., Aylett, R., Ballin, D. (eds) Intelligent Virtual Agents. IVA 2001. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 2190. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_6

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-42570-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-44812-9

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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