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Communicating Emotion in Virtual Environments through Artificial Scents

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNAI,volume 2190)

Abstract

In this paper we describe an emotional- behavioural architecture. The emotional engine is a higher layer than the behaviour system, and it can alter behaviour patterns, the engine is designed to simulate Emotionally-Intelligent Agents in a Virtual Environment, where each agent senses its own emotions, and other creature emotions through a virtual smell sensor; senses obstacles and other moving creatures in the environment and reacts to them. The architecture consists of an emotion engine, behaviour synthesis system, a motor layer and a library of sensors.

Keywords

  • autonomous agents
  • multiple agents
  • emotion
  • virtual environment
  • behavioural architecture
  • virtual sensors
  • virtual smell

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© 2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Delgado-Mata, C., Aylett, R. (2001). Communicating Emotion in Virtual Environments through Artificial Scents. In: de Antonio, A., Aylett, R., Ballin, D. (eds) Intelligent Virtual Agents. IVA 2001. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 2190. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_4

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-42570-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-44812-9

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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