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The InViWo Toolkit: Describing Autonomous Virtual Agents and Avatars

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNAI,volume 2190)

Abstract

The InViWo project aims at providing high-level intuitive tools to describe virtual worlds populated with “intelligent” creatures and avatars. For this purpose, we have defined the Marvin language, which enables the high-level description of autonomous agent behaviours. In this paper, we present the underlying model we have designed, especially our agent and avatar architectures. We then present the main features of the Marvin language and we introduce the use of constraints as powerful tools for describing and combining behaviours.

Keywords

  • Virtual World
  • Constraint Program
  • Agent Behaviour
  • Virtual Agent
  • Behavioural Module

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© 2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Richard, N., Codognet, P., Grumbach, A. (2001). The InViWo Toolkit: Describing Autonomous Virtual Agents and Avatars. In: de Antonio, A., Aylett, R., Ballin, D. (eds) Intelligent Virtual Agents. IVA 2001. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 2190. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_16

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-42570-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-44812-9

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