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A Dramatised Actant Model for Interactive Improvisational Plays

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNAI,volume 2190)

Abstract

We want to provide children, who have been shown to be highly skilled improvisers, with synthetic actors for interactive improvisational plays. Using a conflict oriented play structure we let them experience dramatic situations. Our Dramatised Actant Model maintains a dynamic balance between the opposing forces: a user-controlled avatar and several system characters. The model ensures there is a reasonable amount of interaction between the virtual characters even if the user is not actively contributing to the emergent narrative. We illustrate how the model can be instantiated and realised by presenting a first scenario called “The Black Sheep”. We also give an overview of our 3D virtual environment platform and deliberative agent architecture that we have used to implement the virtual puppet theatre.

Keywords

  • Virtual Environment
  • Synthetic Actor
  • Virtual Character
  • Body Module
  • Agent Architecture

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© 2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Klesen, M., Szatkowski, J., Lehmann, N. (2001). A Dramatised Actant Model for Interactive Improvisational Plays. In: de Antonio, A., Aylett, R., Ballin, D. (eds) Intelligent Virtual Agents. IVA 2001. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 2190. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-44812-8_15

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-42570-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-44812-9

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