Heterogeneous Beliefs Under Different Market Architectures

  • Mikhail Anufriev
  • Valentyn Panchenko

Abstract

The paper analyzes the dynamics in a model with heterogeneous agents trading in simple markets under different trading protocols. Starting with the analytically tractable model of [4], we build a simulation platform with the aim to investigate the impact of the trading rules on the agents’ ecology and aggregate time series properties. The key behavioral feature of the model is the presence of a finite set of simple beliefs which agents choose each time step according to a fitness measure. The price is determined endogenously and our focus is on the role of the structural assumption about the market architecture. Analyzing dynamics under such different trading protocols as the Walrasian auction, the batch auction and the ‘order-book’ mechanism, we find that the resulting time series are similar to those originating from the noisy version of the model [4]. We distinguish the randomness caused by a finite number of agents and the randomness induced by an order-based mechanisms and analyze their impact on the model dynamics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mikhail Anufriev
    • 1
  • Valentyn Panchenko
    • 1
  1. 1.CeNDEFUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdam

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