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Density Functionals for Non-relativistic Coulomb Systems in the New Century

  • John P. Perdew
  • Stefan Kurth
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 620)

Abstract

The material world of everyday experience, as studied by chemistry and condensed-matter physics, is built up from electrons and a few (or at most a few hundred) kinds of nuclei . The basic interaction is electrostatic or Coulombic: An electron at position r is attracted to a nucleus of charge Z at R by the potential energy −Z/|rR|, a pair of electrons at r and r′ repel one another by the potential energy 1/|rr′|, and two nuclei at R and R′ repel one another as ZZ/|RR′|. The electrons must be described by quantum mechanics, while the more massive nuclei can sometimes be regarded as classical particles. All of the electrons in the lighter elements, and the chemically important valence electrons in most elements, move at speeds much less than the speed of light, and so are non-relativistic.

Keywords

Generalize Gradient Approximation Local Density Approximation Correlation Energy Gradient Expansion Local Spin Density Approximation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. Perdew
    • 1
  • Stefan Kurth
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physics and Quantum Theory GroupTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Institut für Theoretische PhysikFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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