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Automata- and Logic-Based Pattern Languages for Tree-Structured Data

  • Frank Neven
  • Thomas Schwentick
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2582)

Abstract

This paper surveys work of the authors on pattern languages for tree-structured data with XML as the main application in mind. The main focus is on formalisms from formal language theory and logic. In particular, it considers attribute grammars, query automata, tree-walking automata, extensions of first-order logic, and monadic second-order logic. It investigates expressiveness as well as the complexity of query evaluation and some optimization problems. Finally, formalisms that allow comparison of attribute values are considered.

Keywords

attribute grammars automata formal languages logic query evaluation XML 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Neven
    • 1
  • Thomas Schwentick
    • 2
  1. 1.University of LimburgGermany
  2. 2.Philipps-Universität MarburgGermany

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