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Recognition of Obstacles on Structured 3D Background

  • Reinhold Huber
  • Jürgen Biber
  • Christoph Nowak
  • Bernhard Spatzek
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2626)

Abstract

A stereo vision system for recognition of 3D-objects is presented. The method uses a stereo camera pair and is able to detect objects located on a structured background constituting a repetitive 3D pattern, e.g. a staircase. Recognition is based on differencing stereo pair images, where a perspective warping transform is used to overlay the left onto the right image, or vice versa. The 3D camera positions are obtained during a learning phase where a 3D background model is employed. Correspondence between images and stereo disparity are derived based on the estimated pose of the background model. Disparity provides the necessary information for a perspective warping transform used in the recognition phase. The demonstrated application is staircase surveillance. Recognition itself is based on a pyramidal representation and segmentation of image intensity differences.

Keywords

False Alarm Rate Correct Recognition Automatic Vehicle Guidance Cross Ratio Image Pyramid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reinhold Huber
    • 1
  • Jürgen Biber
    • 1
  • Christoph Nowak
    • 1
  • Bernhard Spatzek
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Computer Vision GmbH — ACVViennaAustria

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