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Mass Immunization Programs: Principles and Standards

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Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY,volume 304)

Abstract

Mass immunization involves delivering immunizations to a large number of people at one or more locations in a short interval of time. Good mass immunization programs apply planning and quality standards that maximize return on resources invested and provide the greatest individual benefits when immunizing many people in a short period of time. These programs can be used to counter contagious outbreaks, adopted as a repeated means of sustained healthcare delivery, or applied where many people move through a specific place in a short interval of time. Relevant quality standards address appropriate facilities and supplies, training of professional and paraprofessional staff, education of potential vaccinees and methods to screen them for contraindications to immunization, safeguards against anaphylaxis and syncope, documentation, safety surveillance, and a quality-improvement program. Successful mass immunization programs require early planning that builds on existing competencies. As the number of available vaccines increases, prioritizing which vaccines to administer during mass campaigns requires consideration of effectiveness, safety, and a cost-benefit equation from both the individual and community perspectives. Mass immunization campaigns aim to maximize the health of a population, but such campaigns need to be customized based on individual contraindications to immunization. Mass immunization programs need to be conducted ethically, with considerations of benefit versus risk and the need for detailed education of healthcare workers and vaccinees.

Keywords

  • Meningococcal Disease
  • Mass Vaccination
  • Meningococcal Meningitis
  • Training Camp
  • Mass Campaign

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Grabenstein, J.D., Nevin, R.L. (2006). Mass Immunization Programs: Principles and Standards. In: Plotkin, S.A. (eds) Mass Vaccination: Global Aspects — Progress and Obstacles. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, vol 304. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg . https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-36583-4_3

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