Crystal Lattice Automata

  • Jim Morey
  • Kamran Sedig
  • Robert E. Mercer
  • Wayne Wilson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2494)

Abstract

A description of crystal lattices in terms of automata is presented. The words of a language represented by an automata are mapped to points in R 2 and R 3 defining lattice points and their connections. These automata descriptions of crystal lattices reveal subtle properties that are difficult to see in other descriptions. A few applications of these automata are discussed.

Keywords

automata crystallography lattice tiling microworlds 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jim Morey
    • 1
  • Kamran Sedig
    • 1
  • Robert E. Mercer
    • 1
  • Wayne Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Cognitive Engineering LabUniversity of Western OntarioCanada

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