Advertisement

Snakes and Strings: New Robotic Components for Rescue Operations

  • Shigeo Hirose
  • Edwardo F. Fukushima
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics book series (STAR, volume 5)

Abstract

The Japanese government is establishing an International Rescue Complex to promote research and development of key technologies for realization of practical search-and- rescue robots, anticipating for future large-scale earthquakes and other catastrophic disasters. This paper proposes a new paradigm called “snakes and strings”, for developing practical mobile robot systems that may be useful in such situations. “Snakes” stands for snake-like robots, which can skillfully move among the debris of the collapsed buildings. “Strings”, on the other hand, means robotic systems using strings or tethers, such as proposed in the “hyper-tether” research [9]. Tethers can continuously supply energy, accomplish reliable communication link, and also exhibit high traction force. This paper will present many new mechanical implementations of snake-like robots developed in our lab., and also explain in detail the new paradigm.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Mobile Platform Rescue Operation Collapse Building Snake Robot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Y. Umetani and S. Hirose (1974) Biomechanical Study of Serpentine Locomotion. Proc.1st RoManSy Symp.’73, Udine, Italy, pp. 171–184.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. Choset, J. Lunts, et. al. (2000) Design and Motion Planning for Serpentine Robots. Proc. TITech COE/Super Mechano-Systems Symposium 2000, pp. 167–172.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. Mori and S. Hirose (2001) Development of Active Cord Mechanism ACM-R3 with Agile 3D mobility, Proc. IROS, Hawaii, 1552–1557Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. Takayama and S. Hirose (2001) Development of HELIX: a Hermetic 3D Active Cord with Novel Spiral Swimming Motion. Proc. TITech COE/Super Mechano-Systems Symposium 2001, pp. D–3Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    T. Takayama and S. Hirose (2001) Development of “Souryu-I & II”. Proc. TITech COE/Super Mechano-Systems Symposium 2001, pp. HRS–1Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    H. Kimura, K. Nakaya and S. Hirose (2001) Development of “Genbu”: Articulated Multi-Wheeled Mobile Robot. Proc. TITech COE/Super Mechano-Systems Symposium 2001, pp. HRS–11Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    S. Hirose, T. Shirasu and E. F. Fukushima (1996) Proposal for cooperative robot “Gunryu” composed of autonomous segments. Robotics and Autonomous Systems, Elsevier, 17, 107–118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    E. F. Fukushima, N. Kitamura and S. Hirose (2000) A New Flexible Component for Field Robotic System. Proc.’ 00 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, 2583–2588Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    E. F. Fukushima, N. Kitamura and S. Hirose (2001) Development of Tethered Autonomous Mobile Robot Systems for Field Works. Advanced Robotics, 15–4, 481–496CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    S. Havlik (1993) A Reconfi gurable Cable Crane-Robot for Large Workspace Operations. 24th ISIR, pp. 529–536Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    K. E. Zanganeh and J. Angeles (1994) Instantaneous Kinematics and Design of a Novel Redundant Parallel Manipulator. Proc.’ 94 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 3043–3048Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    S. Kawamura, W. Choe, S. Tanaka and S. R. Pandian (1995) Development of an Ultrahigh Speed Robot FALCON using Wire Drive System. Proc.’ 95 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 215–220Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    K. Maeda, S. Tadokoro, T. Takamori, M. Hiller and R. Verhoeven (1999) On Design of a Redundant Wire-Driven Parallel robot WARP manipulator. Proc.’ 99 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, pp. 895–900Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    E. F. Fukushima, P. Debenest and S. Hirose (2001) Development of Autonomous Buggy Robot Gryphon-I. Proc. TITech COE/Super Mechano-Systems Symposium 2001, pp. VCS–26Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeo Hirose
    • 1
  • Edwardo F. Fukushima
    • 1
  1. 1.Tokyo Institute of TechnologyMeguro-kuJapan

Personalised recommendations