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Metals Carola Lidén, Magnus Bruze, Torkil Menné

  • Carola Lidén
  • Magnus Bruze
  • Torkil Menné

Keywords

Contact Dermatitis Patch Test Hexavalent Chromium Allergic Contact Dermatitis Contact Allergy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carola Lidén
    • 1
  • Magnus Bruze
    • 2
  • Torkil Menné
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of Occupational and EnvironmentalDermatology Stockholm County Council NorrbackaStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of Occupational and Environmental DermatologyUniversity Hospital MalmöMalmöSweden
  3. 3.Dermatologisk afdeling KAmtssygehuset GentofteHellerupDenmark

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