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Allergens from the Standard Series

  • Klaus E. Andersen
  • Ian R. White
  • An Goossens

Keywords

Contact Dermatitis Allergic Contact Dermatitis Contact Derma Contact Allergy Hand Eczema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus E. Andersen
    • 1
  • Ian R. White
    • 2
  • An Goossens
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyOdense University HospitalOdense CDenmark
  2. 2.St. John’s Institute of DermatologySt. Thomas’ HospitalLondonUK
  3. 3.Dermatology/Contact allergy, U.Z.K.U. LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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