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Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy for Carcinomas of the Uterine Cervix and Endometrium

  • Patricia J. Eifel

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Target Volume Planning Target Volume Radiat Oncol Biol Phys Clinical Target Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia J. Eifel
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Radiation OncologyM.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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