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Tijuana-San Diego: Globalization and the transborder metropolis

  • Chang-Hee Christine Bae
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

This paper explores the degree to which the Tijuana-San Diego metropolitan region functions as a transborder metropolis. It is shown that the border is quite porous, especially for work and shopping. In addition, the two metropolitan economies are much more complementary than competitive, with San Diego specializing in high-order services and the “new economy” while Tijuana primarily functions as a manufacturing center, based on maquiladora. However, much more cooperation and collaboration are needed in several areas: improving trade infrastructure; addressing the deficits in social infrastructure (especially in Tijuana); making the border crossings more user-friendly; expanding educational opportunities for Latinos in both areas; more priority to environmental problems, especially air quality and sewerage; attempting to reduce the public sector fiscal differentials between the two areas; and more attention to income distribution issues.

Keywords

Quay Crane Toll Road Shopping Trip Border City Global Engagement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chang-Hee Christine Bae
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Urban Design and PlanningUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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