Advertisement

Mexico City as a peripheral global player: The two sides of the coin

  • Boris Graizbord
  • Allison Rowland
  • Adrian Guillermo Aguilar
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

This article considers the effects of globalization on Mexico City, as well as whether this urban area, one of the largest in the world, can be considered a “global city.” We base our arguments on a number of scales of analysis suggested in the literature on these topics. At the international scale, we look at the increased concentration of corporate headquarters and air traffic flows in the city. In terms of its role in the national urban system, we argue that while domestic migration patterns have shifted toward other destinations, the majority of domestically produced merchandise continues to find its way to the capital. At the metropolitan scale, our analysis suggests increasing spatial segregation, as well as longer commutes. At the intraurban level, we find that the sectoral composition of jobs has shifted toward commercial and service sectors, the informal sector has expanded, the labor force is polarizing, and that high-level service sector growth is spatially concentrated. In view of these findings, we suggest that the effects of globalization on Mexico City are mixed, as it consolidates its position as a second-tier global city. We also argue that, in spite of welcome steps toward democratization, pre-existing income inequalities in the country have accentuated the socioeconomic polarization predicted by the literature on global cities and globalization, giving rise to a megacity with two very distinct sides.

Keywords

Mexico City Informal Sector World City Global City Corporate Headquarters 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aguilar AG (1997) Metropolitan growth and labor markets in Mexico. Geo Journal 43:371–383Google Scholar
  2. Aguilar AG (nd) Reestructuración económica y costo social de la Ciudad de México: Una metrópoli “periférica” en la escala global. MimeoGoogle Scholar
  3. Beaverstock J, Smith R, Taylor P (1999) A roster of world cities. Cities 16(6):445–458CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Berry B (1976) Urbanization and counter urbanization. Sage, Beverly Hills, CAGoogle Scholar
  5. Derudder B, et al. (2002) Hierarchical tendencies and regional patterns in the world city network: A global urban analysis of 234 cities. GaWC Research Bulletin 88. http://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/rb/rb88.htmlGoogle Scholar
  6. Derudder B, et al. (2003) Beyond Friedmann’s world city hypothesis: Twenty-two urban arenas across the world. GaWC Research Bulletin 97. http://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/rb/rb97.htmlGoogle Scholar
  7. Expansión (2002) Las 500 empresas más importantes de México. Julio 24:340–442Google Scholar
  8. Friedmann J (1995) Where we stand: A decade of world city research. In: Knox P, Taylor P (eds) World cities in a world system. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  9. Friedmann J (1986) The world city hypothesis. Development and Change 17:69–83CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Garza G (ed) (2000) La ciudad de México en el fin del segundo milenio. Gobierno del Distrito Federal y El Colegio de México, Mexico CityGoogle Scholar
  11. Geyer H, Kontully T (1993) A theoretical foundation for the concept of differential urbanization. International Regional Science Review 15:157–177Google Scholar
  12. Gilbert A (2002) How does a non-global city fit into the global economy? Understanding the international links of Colombia’s capital. Seminar paper: The Impact of Globalization on Urban Development, August 19–23, 2002, Villa Serbelloni, Bellagio, Lake Como, Italy. MimeoGoogle Scholar
  13. Godfrey B, Zhou X (1999) Ranking world cities: Multinational corporations and the global urban hierarchy. Urban Geography 20(3):246–281CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Graizbord B, Acuña B (2002) Ajuste residencial en el Area Metropolitana de la ciudad de México. Seminar paper: La Población en la Región Centro: Situación Actual y Desafíos Demográficos. March 14 and 15, Toluca, Mexico. MimeoGoogle Scholar
  15. Graizbord B, Mina A (1994) Los ambitos geográficos del componente migratorio de la ciudad de México. Estudios Demográficos y Urbanos 9:609–628PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Hack G (2000) Infrastructure and regional form. In: Simmonds R, Hack G (eds) Global city regions: Their emerging forms. Spon Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  17. Hall P (1966) The world cities. Werfenfeld and Nicholson, LondonGoogle Scholar
  18. Hall P (1998) Globalization and the world cities. In: Lo FC, Yeung Y (eds) Globalization and the world of large cities. United Nations University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  19. Hamer AM (1994) Economic impacts of Third World mega-cities: Is size the issue? In: Fuchs R, et al. (eds) Mega-city growth and the future. United Nations University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  20. Holzer HJ, Vroman W (1992) Mismatches and the urban labor market. In: Peterson G, Vroman W (eds) Urban labor markets and job opportunity. The Urban Institute Press, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  21. Ibañez C (2001) Dinámica de la estructura sectorial y espacial del sector servicios en la Ciudad de México: El caso de los servicios al productor. Masters thesis, El Colegio de México, Mexico CityGoogle Scholar
  22. INEGI (1999) Estadísticas del medio ambiente del Distrito Federal y Zona Metropolitana 1999. Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, Mexico CityGoogle Scholar
  23. Iracheta J (2000) Globalización y flujos aereos. In: Garza G (ed) La ciudad de México en el fin del segundo milenio. Gobierno del Distrito Federal y El Colegio de México, Mexico CityGoogle Scholar
  24. Kain J (1962) The journey-to-work as a determinant of residential location. Papers and Proceedings of the Regional Science Association 9:137–160CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Knight R (1989) The emergent global society. In: Knight R, Gappert G (eds) Cities in a Global Society. Sage, Newbury Park, CAGoogle Scholar
  26. Lippman Abu-Lughod J (1995) Comparing Chicago, New York and Los Angeles: Testing some world cities hypotheses. In: Knox P, Taylor P (eds) World cities in a world system. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  27. Negrete ME, Graizbord B, Ruíz C (1993) Población, espacio y medio ambiente en la Zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de México. Serie Cuadernos de Trabajo 2, LEAD-México. El Colegio de México, Mexico CityGoogle Scholar
  28. Parnreiter C (1998) La ciudad de México: Una ciudad global? Anuario de Espacios Urbanos. Historia, Cultura, Diseño 21–52Google Scholar
  29. Richardson H (1980) Polarization reversal in developing countries. Papers of the Regional Science Association 45:67–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Rowland A, Gordon P (1996) Mexico City: No longer a Leviathan? In: Gilbert A, Lo F (eds) Megacities in Latin America. United Nations University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  31. Ruiz Y (2002) Adios maquiladoras. Expansión 24 de julio-7 de agosto:82–91Google Scholar
  32. Sabatini F (2000) The Santiago Region. In: Simmonds R, Hack G (eds) Global city regions: Their emerging forms. Spon Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  33. Sassen S (1991) The global city: New York, London, Tokyo. Princeton University Press, PrincetonGoogle Scholar
  34. Sassen S (1998) The impact of new technologies and the globalization of cities. In: Lo F, Yeung Y (eds) Globalization and the world of large cities. United Nations University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  35. Sassen S (2000) Cities in the global economy. In: Simmonds R, Hack G (eds) Global city regions: Their emerging forms. Spon Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  36. Simmonds R (2000) Emerging cultures of governance. In: Simmonds R, Hack G (eds) Global city regions: Their emerging forms. Spon Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  37. Simmonds R, Hack G (eds) (2000) Global city regions: Their emerging forms. Spon Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  38. Simon D (1995) The world city hypothesis: Reflexions from the periphery. In: Knox P, Taylor P (eds) World cities in a world system. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  39. Simpson W (1992) Urban structure and the labour market. Clarendon Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  40. Sklair L (1991) Sociology of the global system. Johns Hopkins University Press, BaltimoreGoogle Scholar
  41. Smith D, Timberlake M (1995) Conceptualizing and mapping the structure of the world system’s city system. Urban Studies 32: 287–302CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Stutz F (2002) The world economy, class outline notes for chapters 8–12. Downloaded on Februrary 25, 2003 from http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/fstutz/index.htmlGoogle Scholar
  43. Tolosa H (2002) The Extended Rio/Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region: A quest for global integration. Seminar paper: The Impact of Globalization on Urban Development, August 19–23, 2002, Villa Serbelloni, Bellagio, Lake Como, Italy. MimeoGoogle Scholar
  44. Wallerstein I (1984) The politics of the world economy. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  45. Ward P (1990) Mexico City: The production and reproduction of an urban environment. Belhaven Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  46. Ward P (1995) The successful management and administration of world cities: Mission impossible? In: Knox P, Taylor P (eds) World cities in a world system. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  47. WRI (1996) World resources: A guide to the global environment, 1996–97. World Resources Institute, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  48. Young O (1997) Rights, rules and resources in world affairs. In: Young O (ed) Global governance: Drawing insights from the environmental experience. MIT Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boris Graizbord
    • 1
  • Allison Rowland
    • 2
  • Adrian Guillermo Aguilar
    • 3
  1. 1.Camino al Ajusco No. 20El Colegio de MéxicoMéxico, D.F.México
  2. 2.División de Administración Pública, Carretera México-Toluca 3655CIDEMéxico, D.F.México
  3. 3.Instituto de GeografiaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxico, D.F.México

Personalised recommendations