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Investigating Spatial Patterns of Income Disparities Using Coordinate Transformations and GIS Mapping

  • Boris A. Portnov
  • Rimma Gluhih
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Keywords

Geographic Information System Average Income Concentric Circle Income Disparity Spatial Disparity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boris A. Portnov
    • 1
  • Rimma Gluhih
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Natural Resources and Environmental ManagementUniversity of HaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Jacob Blaustein Institute for Desert ResearchBen-Gurion University of the NegevIsrael

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