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Separation of Speech by Computational Auditory Scene Analysis

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Speech Enhancement

Part of the book series: Signals and Communication Technology ((SCT))

Abstract

The term auditory scene analysis (ASA) refers to the ability of human listeners to form perceptual representations of the constituent sources in an acoustic mixture, as in the well-known ‘cocktail party’ effect. Accordingly, computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) is the field of study which attempts to replicate ASA in machines. Some CASA systems are closely modelled on the known stages of auditory processing, whereas others adopt a more functional approach. However, all are broadly based on the principles underlying the perception and organization of sound by human listeners, and in this respect they differ from ICA and other approaches to sound separation. In this chapter, we review the principles underlying ASA and show how they can be implemented in CASA systems. We also consider the link between CASA and automatic speech recognition, and draw distinctions between the CASA and ICA approaches.

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Brown, G.J., Wang, D. (2005). Separation of Speech by Computational Auditory Scene Analysis. In: Speech Enhancement. Signals and Communication Technology. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-27489-8_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-27489-8_16

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