Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus pp 9-42

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 288)

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Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Host Range and Pathogenesis

  • S. Alexandersen
  • N. Mowat

Abstract

In this chapter the host range of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) under natural and experimental conditions is reviewed. The routes and sites of infection, incubation periods and clinical and pathological findings are described and highlighted in relation to progress in understanding the pathogenesis of FMD.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Alexandersen
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. Mowat
    • 3
  1. 1.Pirbright LaboratoryInstitute for Animal HealthSurreyUK
  2. 2.Department of VirologyDanish Institute for Food and Veterinary ResearchLindholmDenmark
  3. 3.Guilford, SurreyUK

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