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Alternative Risk Transfer

  • Christopher L. Culp

Abstract

Alternative risk transfer (ART) refers to the products and solutions that represent the convergence or integration of capital markets and traditional insurance. The increasingly diverse set of offerings in the ART world has broadened the range of solutions available to corporate risk managers for controlling undesired risks, increased competition amongst providers of risk transfer products and services, and heightened awareness by corporate treasurers about the fundamental relations between corporation finance and risk management. This chapter summarizes the dominant products and solutions that comprise the ART world today.

Keywords

Cash Flow Credit Default Swap Loan Portfolio Risk Transfer Investment Income 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin · Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher L. Culp
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Wilderswil (BE)Switzerland
  2. 2.ChicagoUSA

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