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On Representing Special Languages with FLBC: Message Markers and Reference Fixing in SeaSpeak

  • Steven O. Kimbrough
  • Yinghui (Catherine) Yang
Part of the International Handbooks on Information Systems book series (INFOSYS)

Abstract

SeaSpeak is “English for maritime communications.” It is a restricted, specially-designed dialect of English used in merchant shipping and accepted as an international standard. This paper discusses, in the context of SeaSpeak, two key problems in the formalization of any such restricted, specially-designed language, viz., representing the illocutionary force structure of the messages, and formalization of such reference-fixing devices from ordinary language as pointing and use of demonstratives. The paper conducts the analysis in terms of Kimbrough’s FLBC agent communication language.

Keywords

Special Language Propositional Content International Maritime Orga Axiom Schema Illocutionary Force 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven O. Kimbrough
    • 1
  • Yinghui (Catherine) Yang
    • 2
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.University of California at DavisDavisUSA

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