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Challenges and Limitations to the Use of Haploidy in Crop Improvement

  • C.E. Don Palmer
  • W.A. Keller
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 56)

Keywords

Somatic Embryogenesis Anther Culture Fusarium Head Blight Resistance Microspore Culture Heat Shock Transcription Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.E. Don Palmer
    • 1
  • W.A. Keller
    • 1
  1. 1.NRC — Plant Biotechnology InstituteSaskatoonCanada

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