Living in the Urban Wildwoods: A Case Study of Birchwood, Warrington New Town, UK

  • Anna Jorgensen
  • James Hitchmough
  • Nigel Dunnett


Green Space Postal Questionnaire Urban Landscape Urban Green Space Housing Density 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Jorgensen
    • 1
  • James Hitchmough
    • 1
  • Nigel Dunnett
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of LandscapeSheffield UniversitySheffield

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