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The concept of “apparent” Compression Index

  • M. Bardanis
  • M. Kavvadas
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 93)

Abstract

One-dimensional consolidation tests are often performed without accurate control of the initial degree of saturation, since most commercially used testing apparatuses do not permit back-pressuring. As a result, the initial degree of saturation is often less than unity and, thus, the measured ‘Apparent’ Compression Index can be very different than the value corresponding to a fully saturated sample. Similar differences are caused by most oedometer tests being performed up to a maximum stress lower than the maximum pre-consolidation pressure. Oedometer tests on undisturbed samples, on initially unsaturated samples of reconstituted soil, and a data-base of commercial oedometer tests are presented in order to exhibit the effect of high maximum preconsolidation pressure, cementation and initial unsaturation. Finally, expressions for the volumetric deformation of unsaturated soils proposed by Alonso et al. (1990) are used to explain different trends exhibited by the ‘Apparent’ Compression Index for low- and high-plasticity soils.

Keywords

Compression Index Oedometer Test Reconstituted Soil Unsaturated Sample WKDQ WKRVH 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Bardanis
    • 1
  • M. Kavvadas
    • 1
  1. 1.National Technical UniversityAthensGreece

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