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“Accommodative” IOLs

  • Oliver Findl
Part of the Essentials in Ophthalmology book series (ESSENTIALS)

Keywords

Intraocular Lens Anterior Chamber Depth Ciliary Muscle Posterior Capsule Opacification Laser Interferometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliver Findl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyVienna UniversityViennaAustria

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