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DNS of Passive Scalar Transport in Turbulent Supersonic Channel Flow

  • Holger Foysi
  • Rainer Friedrich
Conference paper

Abstract

Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of compressible supersonic channel flow of air at Reynolds numbers ranging from Re τ = 180 to Re τ = 560 and Mach numbers ranging from M = 0.3 to M = 3.0 have been performed. A Navier-Stokes solver of high order accuracy has been vectorized and parallelized to run efficiently on the Hitachi SR8000-F1. Budgets of the Reynolds stresses and the passive scalar fluxes are presented, as well as explanations concerning the reduction of the pressure-correlation terms, using a Green's function approach.

Keywords

Wall Shear Stress Direct Numerical Simulation Drag Reduction Orientation Distribution Function Brownian Particle 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Holger Foysi
    • 1
  • Rainer Friedrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachgebiet StrömungsmechanikTU MünchenGarchingGermany

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