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Radio Monitoring of Supernova 2001ig: The First Year

  • Stuart D. Ryder
  • Elaine Sadler
  • Ravi Subrahmanyan
  • Kurt W. Weiler
  • Nino Panagia
  • Christopher Stockdale
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 99)

Summary

Supernova 2001ig in NGC 7424 has been observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at ∼2 week intervals since its discovery, making this the best-studied Type IIb radio supernova since SN 1993J.We present radio light curves for frequencies from 1.4 to 20 GHz, and preliminary attempts to model the observed behavior. Since peaking in radio luminosity at 8.6 and 4.8 GHz some 1–2 months after the explosion, SN 2001ig has on at least two occasions deviated significantly from a smooth decline, indicative of interaction with a dense circumstellar medium and possibly of periodic progenitor mass-loss.

Keywords

Spectral Index Blast Wave Stellar Wind Radio Luminosity Very Large Array 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart D. Ryder
    • 1
  • Elaine Sadler
    • 2
  • Ravi Subrahmanyan
    • 3
  • Kurt W. Weiler
    • 4
  • Nino Panagia
    • 5
  • Christopher Stockdale
    • 4
    • 6
  1. 1.Anglo-Australian ObservatoryEppingAustralia
  2. 2.School of PhysicsUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Australia Telescope National FacilityCSIRONarrabriAustralia
  4. 4.Naval Research LaboratoryWashington, DCUSA
  5. 5.ESA/Space Telescope Science InstituteBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.Physics Dept.Marquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA

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