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Living with Global Change: Consequences of Changes in the Earth System for Human Well-Being

Part of the Global Change — The IGBP Series book series (GLOBALCHANGE)

Keywords

Climate Change Global Change Earth System Thermohaline Circulation Ozone Hole 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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