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Fire Regime and Tree Diversity in Boreal Forests: Implications for the Carbon Cycle

  • C. Wirth
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 176)

Keywords

Boreal Forest Fire Regime Fire Intensity Crown Fire Bark Thickness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • C. Wirth

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