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The Functional Significance of Forest Diversity: The Starting Point

  • M. Scherer-Lorenzen
  • Ch. Körner
  • E.-D. Schulze
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 176)

Keywords

Ecosystem Process Functional Trait Ecosystem Functioning Latitudinal Gradient Tree Species Diversity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Scherer-Lorenzen
  • Ch. Körner
  • E.-D. Schulze

There are no affiliations available

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