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History and Environment of the Nordic Mountain Birch

  • F. E. Wielgolaski
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 180)

Keywords

Tree Line Birch Forest Mountain Birch Alpine Tundra Birch Seedling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. E. Wielgolaski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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